The Sports Broadcasting Market
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In recent years, the sale of broadcast rights, especially television rights to sporting events and competitions, has become a highly profitable activity, leading to a global industry of approximately $ 30 billion (PricewaterhouseCoopers, 2011). Intensifying competition between broadcasters has increased the rights of many popular sports and has fundamentally changed the nature of these sports. Broadcast rights sales are a major business and source of income for many sports organizations. As detailed later in this book, regulatory changes (see Chapters 5 and 6) and new technological advances (see below) have radically changed both the supply and consumption of sports programs. Most importantly, it ignited the battle for platform leadership.

Competitors the publisher

In Europe, pay-TV operators have begun bidding more than free-to-air on major sports rights and have begun to offer comprehensive live coverage of various sporting events. Recently, converged media players such as cable operators, carriers and internet video platforms have become potentially important players in the sports broadcast epl중계market. Multimedia companies are anxious for competitive advantage, and sports rights (or at least access to sports programs) are key to the overall value of distribution platforms and the use of a combination of telecommunications and streaming services. It has come to be seen as a way to increase. Therefore, it emphasizes the changing situation.

The technical background in which sports rights are sold and used

Selling sports rights has become a highly profitable activity, creating a global industry of approximately $ 30 billion. Intensifying competition between broadcasters has raised prices for popular sports rights and has radically changed the nature of professional sports. For many sports organizations, the sale of broadcast rights is an important source of economic activity and income. As we’ll see later in the book, regulatory changes and technological advances have radically changed the supply and consumption of sports programs, creating a demand-side battle for platform leadership.

In Europe, pay-TV operators have begun to surpass free channels and are the first to introduce large-scale live broadcasts of sporting events. Today, converged media players such as cable operators, telecommunications operators, and internet video platforms are becoming more prevalent and harnessing sports rights. Desperate multimedia companies see sports rights as a by-product and are an overall platform for promoting the use of mass telecommunications services, highlighting changing circumstances in which sports rights are sold and used. It is necessary to increase the value.

This chapter highlights the economic background of selling, purchasing and exercising media rights and sheds light on the dynamics of supply and demand in the global sports rights market. First, we give an overview of the sports broadcasting system in the United States and Europe, and then explain the differences in quantity, price, and rights distribution between the two models. Next, this section describes the economics and resale models of the global sports rights market. In this regard, innovative approaches have been proposed for sports organizations to manage and self-manage broadcast rights in the era of convergence.

Finally, the entry of new media operators and the continued advantage of television in media sports are emphasized. Sports Broadcasting Systems in the United States and Europe The economic environment for sports broadcasting has changed dramatically in recent years due to major changes in the global television market. In short, open to the public.

It has primarily evolved into a globally decentralized, privatized, deregulated entity, opening access to markets, intensifying competition in broadcasting and technological advances, and ending a long era of spectral shortages. I let you.